GRACE LLEWELLYN TEENAGE LIBERATION HANDBOOK PDF

From the Wikipedia Page on Grace as of Nov After teaching for three years, Llewellyn came across the work of John Holt a pioneer in youth rights theory , which led her to re-consider her approach to education. Llewellyn uses examples of rural and urban teenagers who choose various, alternative paths of intentional learning, and she details a variety of possible ways that teens can peruse a rich and multifaceted education and go on to attend college, without attending high school. She emphasizes using personal interests as motivation to learn in a meaningful, real-world context. Instead of such waste, she contends that teens should quit school and take charge of their own learning. Llewellyn backs her claim with hundreds of pages of practical suggestions on how to claim responsibility for your educational life.

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Apr 10, Trina rated it it was ok This is a very provocative book with an interesting perspective on traditional "institutionalized" schooling.

It describes how the traditional school system can actually thwart the natural desire for learning all children have and hinder their ability to learn. The author is a proponent of "unschooling," a radical form of homeschooling which has This is a very provocative book with an interesting perspective on traditional "institutionalized" schooling. Unfortunately, the author essentially proclaims that anyone who would choose traditional school over unschooling is either an idiot, brainwashed, or a willing slave to the will of "the authorities.

I know of many examples where such is the case, and for the author to deny those individuals their positive experience and their personal integrity is disrespectful in the least. Grace Llewellyn beautifully touches on a number of all-too-true reasons why so many of our students are bored or disenfranchised. It could very well change lives. Ok, so we start off with an analogy about wanting to eat fruits and learning to eat that no matter how hard I imagine, I cannot accept as being an analogy for school.

But if I start a literature analysis this post will double in length so I will stop here. Before we even reach part one, the authoress says to kids who actually enjoy school "Maybe I have something to learn about docility. Or maybe I have a healthy aversion to something dead in people that should be alive. In fact, I call your bluff and say that those who enjoy school are the ones who are really alive.

Look at why that rapist in India is so anxious to be tried as a juvenile. After all, we have a phrase called "kids gloves". In Chapter Two, we find out that "School is not for learning". The main arguments are that schools use passive learning, busywork and prioritize appearance over reality.

That is how school is? Wow, to think I learnt how to debate in school, how to research a topic of my choice in school, how to think in school. I never knew that was called passive. I never knew the the multiple drafts I wrote for one essay was called busywork. I thought I was learning how to refine my writing skills.

And look, a quick quiz! But then again, all the books are from the school library. Oops, I think I gave the wrong answers. I guess I failed your quiz. And contradictory. This just means they taught us the difference between facts, opinions, and how to form your own opinion. Chapter Three: What School is for.

Apparently, to churn out workers. True, a lot of entrepreneurs end up dropping out of school, but for me and my friends, school was where we got our first taste of entrepreneurship. When you have to set up a Haunted House yourselves or find a product you can buy and sell at a profit, you learn about things like Supply and Demand really quickly. And yes, this was compulsory for us. And then, she starts talking about teachers in Chapter four.

Either that, or I go to an exceptional school. Do you guys really want me to go on? Bottom line is, the first part is where I disagree with everything. And these are the only things I have reservations from the later sections which are actually the majority of the book.

There is one section where a European girl girl living in Europe reflects on her unschooling experience and mentions that due to the lack of resources, she basically lies to get what she wants. Nice skills for the future you got there. And another section about Japan, which makes the schools sound terrifying. A time to be up and a time to be down. The meaning of this is actually: extremes are bad. In other words, the book gets much better as she gets into advice on how to learn different subjects.

Bottom line, my stand is the same as always: homeschooling is not for everyone. And yes, I carry serious doubts about unschooling.

I think that if the child is not intensely self-motivated, unschooling will not work. How can you be smarter if you have no interest in reading poor language skills , maths, etc? I may just do it. And if you strongly disagree with me, please comment and let me know why no ranting though.

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The Teenage Liberation Handbook: How to Quit School and Get a Real Life and Education

After teaching for three years, Llewellyn came across the work of John Holt a pioneer in youth rights theory , which led her to re-consider her approach to education[ citation needed ]. Llewellyn uses examples of rural and urban teenagers who choose various, alternative paths of intentional learning, and she details a variety of possible ways that teens can pursue a rich and multifaceted education and go on to attend college, without attending high school. She emphasizes using personal interests as motivation to learn in a meaningful, real-world context. One reviewer, Jamie Littlefield, says, "Llewellyn sympathizes with teenagers who get a sub-par education, wasting hours of their time on worksheets, "classroom management," and other needless time-busters. Instead of such waste, she contends that teens should quit school and take charge of their own learning. Llewellyn backs her claim with hundreds of pages of practical suggestions on how to claim responsibility for your educational life. Since its release, the book has sold tens of thousands of copies, and in it was revised and released in an international edition.

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Grace Llewellyn

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