EDWARD SOJA SEEKING SPATIAL JUSTICE PDF

Edward W. Soja argues that justice has a geography and that the equitable distribution of resources, services, and access is a basic human right. Building on current concerns in critical geography and the new spatial consciousness, Soja interweaves theory and practice, offering new ways of understanding and changing the unjust geographies in which we live. When one of the leading urban theorists in the world brings his thinking to bear on the meaning of contemporary urban social movements the result is this brilliant book that shows that another city is possible and explores the ways to achieve it. A stunning reversal of conventional governance and planning in urban America, which almost always favors wealthier residents, this decision is also, for renowned urban theorist Edward W. Soja, a concrete example of spatial justice in action.

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Human life is in every sense spatio-temporal, geo-historical, without time or space, history or geography, being inherently privileged on its own. For Soja, space is all-encompassing as the quote above indicates , everything is space.

Some of these differences might be relatively inconsequential, while others are oppressive. Soja paints a compelling case on the need to pay attention to spatial justice.

He does a good job of explaining the concept of spatial justice, its evolution through the decades and how the concept underpins some of the key work of civil society organisations and activists in LA. The main flaw of Seeking Spatial Justice for me was that Soja has still failed to answer the "what now" question, particularly on the part of policymakers.

Soja makes it clear that his book is not an academic exercise but is meant to draw the link between theory and practice, and to galvanise political and social action. Yet, there is surprisingly little discussion in the book on what stakeholders can do to address spatial injustice in development projects, urban policies, etc.

Soja does include a few LA-based case studies, but it would have been more useful to have a broader discussion on how stakeholders can tackle spatial injustice. Even then, Soja says little on the role of civil society beyond talking about Community Benefit Agreements and exhorting community and labour based organisations to form cross-cutting alliances.

It might have been useful for Soja to discuss the role of policymakers in tackling spatial injustice.

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Seeking spatial justice by Edward W. Soja

Human life is in every sense spatio-temporal, geo-historical, without time or space, history or geography, being inherently privileged on its own. For Soja, space is all-encompassing as the quote above indicates , everything is space. Some of these differences might be relatively inconsequential, while others are oppressive. Soja paints a compelling case on the need to pay attention to spatial justice. He does a good job of explaining the concept of spatial justice, its evolution through the decades and how the concept underpins some of the key work of civil society organisations and activists in LA. The main flaw of Seeking Spatial Justice for me was that Soja has still failed to answer the "what now" question, particularly on the part of policymakers.

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Edward Soja

Metrics details Edward W. Using struggles in and around Los Angeles to demonstrate practices of spatial justice, Soja weaves together accounts of coalition-building politics and university-community engagement to draw attention to the development of theoretical knowledge about space through practical engagement in justice struggles. This turn, evident to Soja in geography but also in sociology, political science and anthropology over the last 30 years, marks the inclusion of space alongside history and society as lenses through which to interpret and engage contemporary politics. Seeking Spatial Justice represents an attempt to encourage readers to adopt this spatial perspective as a corrective against the dominant social-historical approach in the social sciences. According to this account, spatial justice describes justice struggles that attend to concerns over how space is used and how decisions about the use and design of particular spaces are determined. Soja understands spatial justice to be at play in many of the recent organized struggles in the Los Angeles region.

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Seeking Spatial Justice

Thirdspace[ edit ] Soja developed a theory of Thirdspace in which "everything comes together… subjectivity and objectivity, the abstract and the concrete, the real and the imagined, the knowable and the unimaginable, the repetitive and the differential, structure and agency, mind and body, consciousness and the unconscious, the disciplined and the transdisciplinary, everyday life and unending history. He synthesizes these theories with the work of postcolonial thinkers from Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak to bell hooks , Edward Said to Homi K. Like Lefebvre, sometimes called a mystical Marxist, Soja demonstrates leanings towards a monadic mysticism in his Thirdspace. He formulates Thirdspace by analogy with the Aleph , a concept of spatial infinity developed by Jorge Luis Borges. Soja here closely resembles Homi K. Cosmopolis: The primacy of globalization. Globalization of culture, labor and capital.

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